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Reverse Polarity

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  • Reverse Polarity

    I pulled a stupid move hooking up the battery to my 2014 f115 in the dark. I blew the main fuse and the second one blew as well after switching the leads of course. What did I potentially fry? I don't have access to the boat year round so I need all the parts on hand when I head up to Alaska to use it this summer

  • #2
    Well if the fuses blew, they likely did their job of protecting the electrical components. That is what they are there for.

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    • #3
      We need to see a circuit diagram to determine what course the high current went. Usually there is a semiconductor to blow the fuse quickly. Maybe the voltage regulator and/ or rectifier that converts the charging coils to dc.

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      • #4
        The ground side of the wiring is not circuit protected. If and when applying 12 volts to the ground side who knows what is going to happen?

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        • #5
          looks like the Rectifier could have been damaged from the diagram
          Last edited by baitfisherman; 1 week ago.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by baitfisherman View Post
            looks like the Rectifier could have been damaged from the diagram
            It’s one unit so a possibility, but there is no circuit diagram for it. Generally a rectifier doesn’t care whether it gets + or -, it converts to +. But the regulator may suffer damage if there is a Zener diode in it, it will act fully on with reverse voltage.
            The only other concern would be the diode at (e) which also would have passed current. A worry because we need to know where 12 goes to (or indeed what was the purpose of this diode).
            By the way the fuse at (d) should not have blown.
            Last edited by zenoahphobic; 1 week ago.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by zenoahphobic View Post

              It’s one unit so a possibility, but there is no circuit diagram for it. Generally a rectifier doesn’t care whether it gets + or -, it converts to +. But the regulator may suffer damage if there is a Zener diode in it, it will act fully on with reverse voltage.
              The only other concern would be the diode at (e) which also would have passed current. A worry because we need to know where 12 goes to (or indeed what was the purpose of this diode).
              By the way the fuse at (d) should not have blown.
              but it seems we hear about it happening every time someone hooks the battery up wrong

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 99yam40 View Post

                but it seems we hear about it happening every time someone hooks the battery up wrong
                But I can’t see why. Anybody got a theory?

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