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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 11-01-2010
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Location: North Carolina
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Default Carburetor Cleaning Methods

I am getting ready to clean my carbs in my 2006 150 2 stroke and have a question about soaking. I purchased a one gallon container of Berryman’s carb dip and was planning on soaking my carbs in it for an hour or so and then blow out with compressed air. I found a post from a gentleman that stated that soaking the carbs would remove the corrosion protection coating applied at the manufacturer.

Is this true?

It also stated not use any liquid carb cleaner but to use an ultrasonic cleaner instead. I asked around and no one around my area has an ultrasonic cleaner for carb cleaning; and I doubt the jewelry store wants to do it for me. Ha-ha.

Any suggestion on cleaner and cleaning methods would be helpful

Thanks,

Reel Insane
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Old 11-01-2010
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we have a jewelry store, and i take that one home(makes my wife really happy), it does a good job, try to find one, it is well worth it
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Old 11-02-2010
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If I acquire an ultrasonic cleaner, what cleaning solution do I use? I am going to try and find one. If I cannot, what other method will produce good results?
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Old 11-02-2010
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I believe throttle body cleaner is what you're looking for. Throttle bodies have the same protective coating. Typical carb cleaner is too harsh.
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Old 11-02-2010
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Will the Yamaha carb cleaner strip the coating? I am thinking about getting the Yamaha carb cleaner in the bottle and putting that into an ultrasonic cleaner. I am trying to find the best way possible to clean these carbs. How corrosive is the Yamaha carb cleaner?

Thanks,

Reel Insane
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Old 11-02-2010
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Default I would soak them 30min to 1hr in the Berryman's Cleaner...

Thousands and thousands of Yamaha's older 2-stroke carbs have been successfully cleaned by soaking in traditional carb cleaners & dips. Many of them I am sure have had multiple soakings over the years. I don't think the 2-stroke carbs have the same laquer(?) coating as four strokes and they depend on the impermeable "skin" produced in the die-casting process. Obviously you won't want to leave them in overnight or a week, and you should rinse them immediately in hot, soapy water to neutralize the Berryman's carb soak chemicals. Blow them out with compressed air and assemble per the factory specs, with factory kits and you'll be just fine.

The four stroke carbs are a different animal and require a much more gentle cleaning process... That point has been established. If you soak them, and you have a successful rebuild, then it's probably just a matter of time before a problem redevelops.

My 2-cents.

Tom
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Old 11-03-2010
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I was all about dipping them in the first place and had everything ready to go. Then I went off researching different carb cleaning solutions and found that carb coating thread. I did call my local dealer (2 of them) and asked about the carb coating. They both had no idea what I was talking about. They both said to dip them and wash them out with hot soapy water like what was suggested earlier. I will go a step further and blow them out with a little compressed air as well. I appreciate all the feedback from everybody.

Thanks,

Reel Insane
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Old 01-22-2011
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dunno
rebuild several sets a week and have since about 1995 and I havent soaked a carb yet.
with todays fuel I remove the bowl leave all the plugs in and fill the bowls with Yamaha combustion chamber cleaner and let it soak an hour or so.
then remove the plugs and spray everything out with carb and choke cleaner.
my personal preferance is CRC-06064.
the two large brass plugs on the top I leave alone, unless it sank then they need to be remove to look for sand/mud.
there is nothing under them and occasionally the casting cracks on removal.
I only remove the pilot fuel jets,air vent jets or pilot air jets if it sank.
the pilot fuel jets are very small and can shear off easily on removal or reinstallation.
the other two dont have fuel in them.
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Old 01-23-2011
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Taking each and every jet out making sure to mark them due to different size jets in each carb (on some motors), immulsion tube, bowl and carb body. Not the needle, small thin washers, large brass plugs on top, or any rubber parts and soak them in OMC/Bombardier Engine Tune (you can buy by the gallon) for 4 to 6 gours depending on how badly varnished. Spray off with carb cleaner blow out with compressed air and spray lastly with CRC 6-56 multi-purpose lubricant.
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Old 01-24-2011
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Smile

Do it like Rodbolt says, then afterwards remember an "ounce of prevention", install a fuel/water seperater, use Stabil Marine all the time, learn to drain your carbs a couple of times per year, prevent 99% of these carb problems. Good Luck!
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Old 01-25-2011
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Good job and thanks Rodbolt; I printed that one out for the book. Tutorial from real life experience is the best. That Ultrasonic think seems to be latest trend, most techs want to do it. Wonder if the carbs are taken apart as far?
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Old 03-02-2011
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Rodbolt... You say you "remove the plugs and spray everything out with carb and choke cleaner.". Which plugs are you talking about?
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Old 03-03-2011
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on those 150 carbs they have plugs for the main jets,12mm and plugs for the pilot fuel jets,screw slot, and some had bowl drain plugs,10 hex.
leave the 10mm hex alone.
they also like to twist off.
the emulsion tubes on that carb ARE NOT removable.
attempt it and you buy a COMPLEATE carb.
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  #14 (permalink)  
Old 03-05-2011
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Any carb cleaner should be okay, I usually remove all jets - soak both jets and body / float bowl in cleaner. Rinse well with water and blow dry with compressed air.
I find doing 1 pair at a time helps to prevent getting too many parts mixed up.
I personally think the adjustment and settings are more important than cleaning, these are fairly forgiving / basic carbs.
Be sure to check the pilot screw settings before removal - manual tells to you reset to they were prior to removal. I hope this helps!
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Old 03-06-2011
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I thought the manual gave a setting for the pilot screws. 1-1/4 turns out. Has a P & S setting (3/4 I believe) what's that mean? RB how do you drain the bowls without removing the 10mm hex?
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