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2015 yamaha 150 4 stroke salt under cowling

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  • 2015 yamaha 150 4 stroke salt under cowling

    I purchased a newer to me boat about 6 months ago, while doing the pre sale inspection I noticed a good amount of salt on the front of the engine head under the cowling. I asked the marina about this and they told me it was normal for the 150's to get some salt spray. they showed me another boat about the same age with dual 150's on it and had similar salt/corrosion.
    So my question for other 150 owners, is that common to that year/HP of yamahas?
    any suggestions on how to keep more corrosion from happening under the cowling?
    is it advisable to rinse the engine block ? if so, any precautions I should take?
    thx in advance.

  • #2
    That whole engine can and should be able to get wet. It is advisable to rinse under the cowling remove the cowling and flood rinse the whole powerhead with fresh water. all the electrical components/connectors are water proof.

    I wouldn't pressure wash it, but you probably could...

    Keeping your under cowling outboard engine clean is important. We do not have an air filter per say. We have a flame arrestor or called airbox. Un filtered air is sucked from under inside the cowling and goes straight through the engine only being baffled and without really being filtered.

    The engines, if they were not intended to get wet, then the cowling would be waterproof. When I recover from running, the seas 1/2 engulf my engines. The sea water comes up under and around the engine cowling skirt, and then drains back out the same way.

    Now, I do not wash under the cowling after every trip, but if I intend to put the boat up for more than a month or so, I'll try to let it sit with a fresh water rinse rather than stewing in its own brine...
    If its got teats or tires, you bound to have trouble with it....

    Comment


    • #3
      AND be careful with the cowling seal. Be mindful when setting the cowling down and picking it up. Try not to drag it across the dock. If I can, I set it seal side down on a smooth surface or a towel, blanket if needed.

      If the seal gets oily, I wash it (mine is a two stroke and the oil reservoir cap or tank was leaking prior to my custodianship)

      I hate when the wife has a kid at home depot put something heavy in the trunk of the car and they lazily drag it across the trunk molding / seal.
      If its got teats or tires, you bound to have trouble with it....

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by CaptSolo
        I get salt under the cowlings on my F225s - and I have three. What you are seeing is not corrosion.
        It's salt (table salt). Just wipe it off.
        I saw a neat "Salt Away" system. It is a bottle that attaches to the garden hose like a lawn cinch bug sprayer. Supposedly, it is some soap chemical that is designed to rinse away salt. That may be something, but I have not eveluated it so this is not an endorsement.

        I would probably be compelled to rinse SaltAway off after I used it to rinse the salt away....
        If its got teats or tires, you bound to have trouble with it....

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by FabricGATOR View Post
          I saw a neat "Salt Away" system. It is a bottle that attaches to the garden hose like a lawn cinch bug sprayer. Supposedly, it is some soap chemical that is designed to rinse away salt. That may be something, but I have not eveluated it so this is not an endorsement.

          I would probably be compelled to rinse SaltAway off after I used it to rinse the salt away....
          interesting you say that. i just saw someone that uses it religiously and leaves it in the motor after rising with it

          "From their site:
          Salt-Away Applications ... :

          Salt-Away is a water-based, non-hazardous, biodegradable solution and contains properties that dissolve, release and remove salt crystals from any surface. Water alone does not remove all the salt from a surface.

          Use of Salt-Away does not correct past damage but will work to protect against salt corrosion and reduces costly repairs caused by salt.

          Salt-Away breaks apart and removes salt accumulation with repeated use.

          Salt-Away can safely be used on all metals, fiberglass, paint, rubber, plastic, chrome, glass, concrete, brick or any surface exposed to salt. Salt-Away, mixed with water, washes away the salt then leaves a protective film on surfaces until surfaces are again exposed to water or salt.

          Special high-performing corrosion inhibitors in the product help protect metals from corroding if not rinsed off. Salt-Away will not strip wax or cause streaks or spots. It is easy to apply by using pressure or power washers, Salt-Away's special Mixing Unit, the ready-to-use spray bottles for smaller jobs, and by immersing items into a mixture of Salt-Away and water.

          Salt-Away brings you the finest, safest, most reliable product in its category. These features have been standard since Salt-Away’s inception in 1994.

          © Copyright, Salt-Away Products 1994. All rights reserved.


          Non Hazardous. Contains no hazardous chemicals.
          Non-Toxic. Safe to use around plants, children, pets and all living things.
          Biodegradable. All ingredients biodegrade into the environment.
          Environmentally Safe. Has no deleterious effects in the environment. Safe to discharge into normal drainage outlets connected to filter systems.
          Water based.
          Contains no petroleum products.
          Contains no chemical solvents.
          Does not react chemically or physically as an emulsifier on lubricants and coatings.
          Inhibits rusting and corrosion.
          Completely removes fresh salt.
          Breaks down layers of salt accumulation.
          Is chemically dissimilar to any competitive product.
          Ingredients are the highest quality available."

          Comment


          • #6
            I've NEVER had any salt residue under the cowl in 11 years of use (2006, F150).

            You saw the pic's I posted. I have NEVER hosed off the powerhead with water, never needed to..(you could, just be gentle with the hose.

            Now if someone ran the boat with the cowl off, for testing purposes(YDS hooked up), sure you'll get spray all over the powerhead, just from splashing, hitting wakes, etc.

            If you look closely at your cowl, you'll see actual drain lines for ANY water that happens to get splashed in the intake (of the cowl).

            Once it's hosed off and dried, un-less you have a water leak, you shouldn't see any salt water spray.

            Caveat: I replaced a bad transducer with a new design from Humminbird years ago. This particular unit, once under way, literally SCOOPED water up and threw a heavy stream (much more than a stream actually) all over the engine. Pulled that POS off and found a new old stock unit(same as I had before).

            I won't go out in more than 2' sea's. With that, I get a light mist, with wakes, bouncing, etc on the cowl after a days use.
            Last edited by TownsendsFJR1300; 05-20-2017, 06:51 AM. Reason: added engine info
            Scott
            1997 Angler 204 CC, 2006 F150 TXR

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by CHEWBAKA1973 View Post
              interesting you say that. i just saw someone that uses it religiously and leaves it in the motor after rising with it

              "From their site:
              Salt-Away Applications ... :

              Salt-Away, mixed with water, washes away the salt then leaves a protective film on surfaces until surfaces are again exposed to water or salt.
              I am not familiarized with the product, so I know that a neutral Ph water rinse is safe, I would not be surprised to find salt away to be something off of 7, that is why I would rinse it...

              After a water rinse and air dry (without salt away) a thin film WD-40 would give a protective barrier and it might even make the fish bite harder!
              If its got teats or tires, you bound to have trouble with it....

              Comment


              • #8
                I just watched the youtube video on that Salt-away and think I'll try it on my grandson's new to him's boat with an F115 that has "salt" residue under the cowling. I'll report back on the results.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Reel Kahuna View Post
                  I just watched the youtube video on that Salt-away and think I'll try it on my grandson's new to him's boat with an F115 that has "salt" residue under the cowling. I'll report back on the results.
                  My neighbor just bought a larger Persuit boat (2015 maybe, 28', cherry condition).

                  After an outing he sprays the exterior with SA.

                  No car wash, no rag, brush, just SA and there are NO MORE salt spots (found all about the fiberglass hull) to be found. If you were to simply spray with water and nothing else, the salt spots would still be there..

                  A toothbrush and very light spray on any larger build up (say around head gaskets, typical corrosion area's, etc) would help get it spotless...
                  Last edited by TownsendsFJR1300; 05-20-2017, 07:53 AM.
                  Scott
                  1997 Angler 204 CC, 2006 F150 TXR

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you are getting salt residue under the cowling that means the motor is sucking a saltwater mist up under there with the air it needs to run and possibly getting inside the motor also.
                    do your best to stop things from causing water to be splashed/sprayed around the motor while under way

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I expect someone will arrive soon and say this is perfectly normal. As normal as water bubbles and spins up driveshafts.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        http://www.yamahaoutboardparts.com/f...d-th28371.html

                        From Rodbolt: "not the first snapped rod I ever saw due to the water leak was faster than the cowl drains.

                        not the first piston failure I ever saw from water mist."
                        Last edited by TownsendsFJR1300; 05-20-2017, 12:18 PM.
                        Scott
                        1997 Angler 204 CC, 2006 F150 TXR

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          As I said, he would be along shortly. The OP had correct guidance from a couple of people...I think he can figure out which ones to follow.

                          How is the stop leak working for the oil seal?

                          Remember your advice on checking the oil? "Just wait for the alarm to sound, then add oil." Good stuff!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            [QUOTE=CHEWBAKA1973;139354]I purchased a newer to me boat about 6 months ago, while doing the pre sale inspection I noticed a good amount of salt on the front of the engine head under the cowling. I asked the marina about this and they told me it was normal for the 150's to get some salt spray. they showed me another boat about the same age with dual 150's on it and had similar salt/corrosion.
                            So my question for other 150 owners, is that common to that year/HP of yamahas?
                            any suggestions on how to keep more corrosion from happening under the cowling?
                            is it advisable to rinse the engine block ? if so, any precautions I should take?
                            thx in advance.[/QUOTE

                            My experience with the F150. I have a little rust on the lift pump screws and the vertical bracket over the intake on the starboard side. I use Boeshield on those and other areas to hopefully stop this issue.
                            I remove the plastic covers (2) under the cowl and lightly spray the engine with water generally after every run. Avoiding direct spray on silencer opening. Dries quickly in the sun.

                            I generally take no advice from dealers or marinas regarding motors or boats.
                            I will talk to known, good mechanics all day...

                            Comment

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