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Lower Unit Drive Shaft Seals Clearance

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  • Lower Unit Drive Shaft Seals Clearance

    2004 300TXRC. Replacing drive shaft seals. Manual calls to set the top seal at a depth of 0.25Ė 0.75 mm (0.01Ė 0.03 in) from the top of the bearing carrier flange. Iím assuming thatís to insure proper lubrication of the bearing by not obstructing the supply orifice. Can anyone share any tricks to do just that? I was thinking about driving the bottom seal a little pass the top edge, then set the top seal and drive both down until the top is at the appropriate depth. What you think? I have a caliper as well as depth gauges. Thanks.

  • #2
    Originally posted by lockhah1 View Post
    2004 300TXRC. Replacing drive shaft seals. Manual calls to set the top seal at a depth of 0.25Ė 0.75 mm (0.01Ė 0.03 in) from the top of the bearing carrier flange. Iím assuming thatís to insure proper lubrication of the bearing by not obstructing the supply orifice. Can anyone share any tricks to do just that? I was thinking about driving the bottom seal a little pass the top edge, then set the top seal and drive both down until the top is at the appropriate depth. What you think? I have a caliper as well as depth gauges. Thanks.
    Trying to remember....I think I did just that.

    I made a mark on the inside of carrier before removing old seal to help with overall depth. I believe I also used a piece of PVC to press the seal in place. Just happened to have the correct size scrap in garage.

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    • #3
      interesting,
      does anyone know if there is suppose to be a gap between the 2 seals and if so how big of a gap?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by lockhah1 View Post
        2004 300TXRC. Replacing drive shaft seals. Manual calls to set the top seal at a depth of 0.25Ė 0.75 mm (0.01Ė 0.03 in) from the top of the bearing carrier flange. Iím assuming thatís to insure proper lubrication of the bearing by not obstructing the supply orifice. Can anyone share any tricks to do just that? I was thinking about driving the bottom seal a little pass the top edge, then set the top seal and drive both down until the top is at the appropriate depth. What you think? I have a caliper as well as depth gauges. Thanks.
        Measure the thickness of your seal with your calipers. Carefully drive down the lower seal below top surface the thickness you measured, PLUS the .010"-.030" into the carrier. Go slowly and keep measuring so you don't overshoot and drive the seal too far down. Then put the top seal in and drive it carefully down until it just touches the lower seal....it should then be at the required depth below the top surface of the carrier.
        I don't think I would be driving one seal down in the bore using the other.

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        • #5
          I donít think it took a whole lotta force to move those seals into place. No banging or grunting necessary.

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          • #6
            well, the SM instructions typically state

            "install an oil seal half way into the drive haft housing,"

            but which does that mean?

            - push the first seal down into the housing, until it is located about the mid point ?

            or

            - push the first seal into the housing only part-way,
            stopping with the top half of the seal "sticking out" of the housing?

            (I've only done it once - and I don't remember what I did....)

            And then there's the question of that ending "depth" dimension -
            seems I recall Rodbolt saying it was "important" -
            but I didn't/don't understand why....

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            • #7
              Rodbolt also suggested using the proper tool. I thought this tool was cut to push them into place with the proper depth. Which may imply top seal is pushing bottom seal into
              place?

              where is he?

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              • #8
                It is nice to have the tool's for the job.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by pstephens46 View Post
                  I donít think it took a whole lotta force to move those seals into place. No banging or grunting necessary.
                  I will change my wording "Tap or push the seal gently into the bore with a suitable size socket or piece of plastic tube"

                  Whit the factory tool it is a no brainer, push the first one in till its almost flush then put the top one on the tool and use the tool to set them both in place at the same time. As shown in SM picture.

                  Problem is... who has the special tool for the job? The dealer.

                  OP is looking for DIY method and I doubt he is willing to pay hundreds of dollars for a special tool to do it. I suppose you could bring in the carrier housing into the dealer and have them put them in.

                  I imagine there is an oil passage to let the top of the needle bearing recieve oil and the right depth of the seals is required so you don't cover that hole. OP has carrier in hand and says this the case.

                  Rodnut be along shortly to correct us all...lol

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                  • #10
                    The oiling hole on the F150 was pretty far down from what I remember in the side of that carrier. I think if you pushed the seals far enough down to block, it would be noticeable compared to depth of originals. Thatís why I suggested measuring/marking carrier for reference. Pretty easy job overall. Propshaft seals.....another matter.

                    not suggesting the proper tool is required.

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                    • #11
                      Most of the carriers have a step in the bore that stops the seal from covering the lube hole.

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                      • #12
                        You are right, I do not have the Yamaha tool. I recognize the tool also insure the seals remain square with the drive shaft as you drive them down. I will be using a road bike bottom bracket adapter (made out of delrin) with an inner bore ID very close to the drive shaft OD. It fits nicely on top of the seal, just a tad smaller. Iím sure a socket or PVC pipe with the right dimm. will work just as good.

                        I do not recall a step/stop above the orifice for the seals to seat against (bummer)Ö...that would have made things a lot easier. Do not have the carrier with me, but I will confirm.

                        Looks I will be measuring the thickness of the seals and use that method to get the job done.

                        Great discussion. Thanks for the feedback. I hope it helps others in the future.

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                        • #13
                          sounds and looks like the seals are stacked right against each other, so my question if there was a gap has been answered.

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                          • #14
                            that tool is easy for any machine shop to make.
                            if I need a tool I draw it and take it to the welding shop or a friends and make it.

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